Firefighters use tactical response to wildfires

Brooklyn Adams
Editor-in-Chief

While firefighters put their lives on the line, the community came together as a whole to battle the worst Oregon wildfires together. Not only providing assistance to firefighters, the community was able to help one another evacuate safely. The community coming together allowed the firefighters to use tactical action towards the fires.

“I want to thank the community for all the donations and support during these unprecedented times. We have empathy for all the fire evacuees, several of our staff and volunteer firefighters,” Sandy Fire Chief, Phil Schneider said.

Oregon  had record breaking wildfires this year with over a million acres burned across the state. The wildfires ripped though the state burning homes, buildings, and structures, along with many towns and cities. These wildfires ripped from the gorge all the way down to the California border burning anything and everything in their paths. 

Firefighters were put into an intense battle with these wildfires, with extreme wind and high temperatures they were almost unbearable. Wildfires are able change and make their own weather making them very hard to predict and stay on top of. At any moment when firefighters are in danger, they will evaluate the situation and reposition when the time is right. This is a part of tactical response to the fires.

Across the state and only one town over, the Riverside wildfire burned over 200,000 acres of Estacada land, with many homes involved in the burn. The wildfires caused almost 500 firefighters to be out on the line trying to contain the wildfire. 

As of Oct. 18, fall burning has begun, with not only homeowners allowed to burn, but also controlled burn crews in Mt. Hood National Forest. Controlled burns allow for removal of dead and already burnt out areas as well. 

“Piles are from hazardous fields reduction projects, timber sales, and timber stand improvement projects,” Mt. Hood National Forest state said in a statement. These piles are tinned and reduced as crews start the burns in early morning allowing for them to burn out by the evening. Controlled burns can help prevent another harmful year of wildfires and smoke that drifted over the state in late summer 2020. 

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